Mistons
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sickpage:

Michael Salisbury
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likeafieldmouse:

The First Photograph of a Human Being
"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography. 
Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. 
Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”
likeafieldmouse:

The First Photograph of a Human Being
"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography. 
Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. 
Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”
likeafieldmouse:

The First Photograph of a Human Being
"This photograph of Boulevard du Temple in Paris was made in 1838 by Louis Daguerre, the brilliant guy who invented the daguerreotype process of photography. 
Aside from its distinction of being a super early photograph, it’s also the first photograph to ever include a human being. 
Because the image required an exposure time of over ten minutes, all the people, carriages, and other moving things disappear from the scene. However, in the bottom left hand corner is a man who just so happened to stay somewhat still during the shot — he was having his shoes shined.”
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undr:

Dorothy Bohm
Paris, 1950
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criterioncollection:

Czech poster for Federico Fellini’s LA DOLCE VITA.
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"Please Forward Contents" by Gary Panter at The Paris Review
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Laurinda Spear and Bernardo Fort-Brescia, Miami House
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Carole Lombard and Shirley Grey in Virtue (1932)
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Siouxie by Brian Griffin
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Markus Lange
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